Enjoy a nice walk to Cascade Falls

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I had explored several old mining and off-road trails around Ouray (pronounced u-ray) Colorado and was looking to explore on foot. It was late afternoon so I wasn’t up for anything too long; just something scenic to finish the day that didn’t involve driving.

I saw a sign on the North side of town that said Cascade Falls with an arrow pointing up the hill. I turned up the road aptly named “Cascade Falls” and headed up less than a mile to the parking area.

A large sign greets visitors with a brief history of the falls and a trail description. The falls are named after Cascade Creek which is the primary drainage for Cascade Mountain. The course of Cascade Creek takes it over a series of 7 waterfalls and Cascade Falls is the final series. If this is the 7th series, I’d sure like to see the first 6! Maybe that’ll be tomorrow’s adventure…

Shortly after starting up the trail, I found a couple of benches and a wooden bridge. At this point the trail forks; the left fork heads for the falls and the right fork heads to the Amphitheater campground.

I almost just walked left toward the falls but decided to wander over to the benches. Wow!! I could see the entire waterfall cascading from the top of the mountain all the way to the rocky bottom. If I hadn’t stopped, I would’ve missed a great view. These benches are a great place to observe the grandeur of the falls without taking the full walk to the base.

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Like most people, I had to get closer to the falls and walked over the bridge and followed the short trail the falls. The trail forks again and I took the right fork which follows the stream, but appears to be a little more jagged than the left trail. Either one will get you there.

At the base of the falls, you can feel the mist of the water, look up and see the several layers of the falls. The side of the mountain has rock shelves that are horizontal and appear to lead right to behind the falls. I found the rocks too slick for my comfort level. Besides, I wanted to enjoy the falls, not become part of them!

While at the base, look a little up and to the right and you’ll see a square, cave like opening. A couple of people were enjoying a unique perspective from inside there.

I enjoyed getting out on foot and experiencing the beautiful falls without the need to drive far or even carry a back pack. When you’re in Ouray and looking for scenic stroll in town, be sure to stop by Cascade Falls.

Crabtree Falls Hike

Crabtree Falls“Services closed” was the first sign I saw when I pulled into Crabtree Falls off the Blue Ridge Parkway. Those signs always make me a little sad because being outside and enjoying nature is good for the soul, no matter your age or background.

Thankfully, the parking lot was still open which provided access to the hiking trail. The trail starts out as a paved trail and as it descended became a dirt path. Passing an empty amphitheater, I couldn’t help but wonder what shows had been there and if it would be open again.

Continuing through a grassy area, the trail then takes a right turn and goes through part of the former campground. Nestled among the trees, and away from the road, this would be a great place to camp!

After the campground, there was a sign that said Crabtree Falls loop, 2 miles, strenuous. Hmmm….it is late in the day, but it can’t be that bad. Taking the right fork of the trail, we headed into the forest and began our descent.

Through the lush forest, the path descended via a long series of stairs made of stone and logs. Nothing unusual there, a lot of mountain hiking trails have stairs. This trail was different because each turn brought on more stairs that continued the trail’s steep descent.

Downward we continued and the amount of stairs reminded me of walking down a lighthouse, just not as steep. Ok, I think I know why this trail is called strenuous; going back up is really going to suck! Hiking is a blast, but you know whatever you go down, you’ll probably have to come back up.

The decent continued through the forest and I felt like I was on a quest more so than a hike. Around one more corner and the sound of rushing water and a muddy trail signaled we were close. A wooden bridge came into view and we had made it!!

Aside from Looking Glass falls, this was one of the widest waterfalls I’d seen in the area. The mist of the falls highlighted the sun beams as the afternoon sun broke through the tree tops.

I’m not sure what it is, but you always have to get closer to a waterfall. Fortunately there are two short trails on either side that provide some inspirational photo ops. The area isn’t that large so once a few people arrive, it can feel crowded.

After a few photos and being misted by the falls, it was time to head back. The question was which way? The ascent from hell or the unknown other half of the loop, which could be just as steep.
The choice was quickly made to take continue on the trail and see where it exited. Greeted by steep stairs, this trail appeared to be similar as the other one. Up it went through the lush green forest, but the stairs were short lived.

The path became a dirt path among the trees with a waterfall view to the left. The trail was still steep here, but it wasn’t stairs and a few benches along the way provided water stops.

Once the trail made it past the falls, it leveled out significantly and was more of “normal” trail. As I crossed a wooden bridge, I looked at the creek below and commented “I know where that’s going!” We always see waterfalls at their end, so it’s intriguing to see them at their beginning.

The trail continued to ascend on the way to the old campground. Here I got a little confused because I recognized the campground and knew we came in from across it. Cutting across the campground, we found the original path and made it to the parking lot.

The entire loop is 2.5 miles and rated strenuous, but with enough time and plenty of hydration it can be done. For more information: http://www.blueridgeparkway.org/v.php?pg=38

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The Waterfalls of DuPont State Forest

I love hiking to waterfalls; the walk through the forest, the rushing sound of the water as you approach, and the anticipation that builds. Will the waterfall be gushing off the top of a mountain? A series that cascade into a plume below? Or something simple but elegant that just is perfect?

When a friend invited me to hike a trail that included three popular waterfalls, I had to say yes!  As we grabbed our gear in the parking lot, the sound of the flowing river was so inviting I couldn’t wait to hit the trail.

Our route today would take us by High Falls, Triple Falls, and Bridal Veil Falls all located in DuPont State Forest in North Carolina.  According to the map, the mileage for this round trip adventure would only be 3-4 miles so that gave us plenty of time to thoroughly explore.

The Route:

Starting from the Hooker Falls parking lot, the trail takes an unusual route; up the stairs, across the two lane road (look both ways), and then along the opposite side of the bridge. The road is not busy so the walk is easy, still be careful. Stopping on the bridge is a great place to get a view of the clear river flowing over the rocks.

After crossing the bridge, the trail goes down the stairs and then stays right. If you go under the bridge, the scenery is still beautiful, but it’s not the right direction to find the falls.

The wide trail and crystal clear river make for a beautiful hike through the forest. The river looks so calm you don’t realize the power of the current until you stop and look intently. Toss a stick or leaf in and you’ll easily see just how fast it’s flowing.

Triple Falls:

Our first stop was Triple Falls and wow, what a view from the trail!  The falls start at the top of the mountain and then cascade down three high ledges into the valley.  The view from the trail is amazing, but you have to take the boardwalk down to the falls to get the full effect.

As you exit the last stairs, you hear the deafening roar of water and feel the mist on your face.  Perfect! I like to venture as close as possible to get that unusual photograph or just because I can. Well waterfalls create wet rocks and it wasn’t long before I was imitating a cartoon character that stepped on a banana peel.  All four limbs were flailing in all directions with the hope of somehow not falling. Fortunately, I didn’t fall into the water. I wouldn’t have gone down the falls, but I would’ve been wet and cold.

High Falls:

Further up the trail, we came to another opening and the entire side of the mountain was a steep waterfall.  Unlike Triple Falls which cascades over a few ledges, High Falls just falls almost vertically about 125 feet to the bottom.  There isn’t a trail down to the base because of the steep incline but at the top there appeared to be a covered bridge. Of course I wanted to know if we could there.

Sure enough, as we followed the trail, we exited in front of that quaint, photogenic bridge that crossed the river just before the falls began.

The bridge was a great lunch spot and perfect place to admire the dichotomy of views.  On the forest side of the bridge, it was just a peaceful river that I’d love to kayak on. The water is clear, calm, and the trees are tall.

On the other side of the bridge, the river flows for a short distance and then just disappears. I could see myself kayaking down this river, admiring the covered bridge from below and then suddenly wondering where the river went. By the time I realized it, I’d be in for an unforgettable ride. Note to self; I need to pay more attention when I’m kayaking.

Bridal Veil Falls:

We left the bridge and continued down the dirt road to reach the final destination. Along the way there are trails into the forest, but we saved those for the return trip.  A couple of cyclists passed us and I noted that for next time. This is definitely a peaceful place to ride and explore.

A short while later, we took a right turn down another trail and were greeted with the sound of rushing water.  As we emerged from the trail, we saw an awesome sight; a sloped granite face, with millions of gallons of water, blasting down in full force.

Thanks to natures design, there is a spot you can sit on a rock and face the falls.  You are on an outcropping and the falls go just below that so you’re literally just a few feet away from the rushing power. Myself and others captured some fun photographs there.

Sitting facing the thunderous waves of water is quite thrilling. There’s something magical about being in the wilderness and safely enjoying the beauty of nature’s power.

One last view:

As we walked back, we decided to take one of the side trails that go up a levy. We followed the trail to the top and the view was like a postcard!  Stretched before us was a large, glass smooth mountain lake.  The crystal clear water revealed the bottom was covered in a layer of leaves which added a unique effect.  It was so peaceful, I could see sitting here for hours and letting all my cares melt away. However, the only thing melting at this time was the daylight so it was time to make our way back.

The final portion of the trail crosses the road before the parking lot.  As I looked down the two lane road, I had to wonder how many people speed cross the bridge and never know the magnificent beauty that lies beyond.   I wonder how many times I’ve been one of those people…..

http://www.ncwaterfalls.com/bridal_dupont1.htm