Rich history and Golden views in Animas Forks

What a view! I said to myself standing on the porch of the house. Several fourteen thousand foot peaks lay at the end of large grassy meadow; the house was situated perfectly to take in the view.

It’s always interesting that no matter the culture, or time in history, people always enjoy great views from home. The home I was in was famous because it was the “first” in the area to have indoor plumbing. Back in the 1800s that was something to brag about.

It was called indoor plumbing because the path to the outhouse was enclosed. Can you imagine having an outhouse down the hall from your living room? If you’ve used a pit toilet in the National Forest, you know what I mean. And I thought my cat’s litter boxes were bad…

History:
Animas Forks was initially known as Three Forks of the Animas in 1873. The name was changed in 1875 to Animas Forks to accommodate the post office. In the summer time, the population swelled to 450 people. As a side note, the town of Ouray Colorado today only has around 896 people.

The town survived the boom/bust cycles of mining from 1873 all the way to 1920. Another fun fact; at 11,200 feet the Animas Forks Pioneer was the only newspaper published and printed at so high an elevation in the United States. Other interesting facts are on the picture of the sign, just enlarge it to read it.

Walking around:
The historic site has several old buildings that you can actually go in and walk around. I enjoy going into historic places and imagining what it must’ve been like to live back then. There’s just something about being in the same room and walking on the same floor as the people who lived there in the 1800s.

Oh, and if you have to use the restroom during your visit, there are modern day outhouses just down the road about a block.

Looking away from town toward the mountains you can see Cinnamon Pass snake up the side of the mountain which goes to Lake City. To the left is the main road that eventually goes over Engineer Pass which will also take you to Lake City. One fellow explorer said it was about two hours over the pass which requires four wheel drive.

One of the most intriguing parts of Animas Forks is down the road and behind the old town. Following the dirt road through town and to the left, you’ll embark on a very rocky road. Just around the bend, you’ll see a giant old building looming ahead.

It’s sheer size and state of ruin is irresistable; you have to go see it. Again, you are allowed to walk inside the building and see the history first hand. (See the below video) Most mining ruins are dwarfed by the Rocky Mountains; this one holds its own. I believe it was the Gold Prince mine which was constructed for $500,000 in 1904 making it the costliest mine built in Colorado at that time.

Getting there:
Animas Forks is located SE of Silverton Colorado. From downtown Silverton follow the road past the museum and head toward the signs for a mining tour and Engineer Pass. The road will change to a wide dirt road and stay that way for a while. After a bridge,the road narrows and will be a little rougher.

When the road is dry, you should be able to reach Animas Forks by car; it’ll just be bumpy in spots. Or you can rent a Jeep in town and head out. Either way, give yourself some time to enjoy the history and scenic views. If you leave early enough and have a 4wheel drive, you can explore Animas Forks and then head over Cinnamon or Engineer Pass for more breath taking views.

Either way, take the time to enjoy the history and spectacular views; you’ll be glad you did.

This video starts with a pan of the surrounding area and then I walk inside, enjoy!

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