Four days, one back pack….can I really do this?

This isn’t going to fit……I said as I looked at the pile of clothes and gear on the bed. I was heading to North Carolina for the weekend and was determined to take just my back pack. I’m not a light traveler, so this was going to be a challenge, but that was part of the reason for the trip.

I could see myself getting on the plane, placing the pack under the seat, and easily disembarking upon arrival. No bag check, no fees, no waiting at the baggage claim, and no worries about trunk space. Just grab and go.

Making it work:
A little clarification is in order; my back pack is not like the large, steel framed one I carried for four days in the Grand Canyon. It’s what I call a commuter back pack that is the perfect size for traveling because it snugly fits (gets close enough), under the seat on commercial flights. In spite of it’s small size, it has been to a lot of cool places and as I write this, it’s packed for another adventure.

I was heading to the mountains, which were cold so I carried layers. First were my clothes: zip off pants, shirts, rain jacket, and socks. Next up was my DLSR with 18-200mm lens, and a water tight container that housed two video cameras and their mounting/cabling accessories. Ok, that took up all of the space. I still had my fleece jacket and a few other small items that just wouldn’t fit.

I reluctantly drug out my gym bag, which seemed to swallow everything up into a dark abyss. This isn’t going to fit under the seat at all. Plus, what am I going to take on the hiking trails? And then it hit me… I loaded everything in the back pack, and used a cloth grocery bag to hold my jacket and camera. Perfect!!

What a feeling to stroll through the airport with just my backpack and a small bag. To comply with the one carryon rule, I wore my jacket, stuffed my camera into the back pack, and rolled up the shopping bag. I made it with one bag after all; thankfully I didn’t have to open it till I arrived!

Freedom:
Wow, what a way to travel!! When it came to get off the plane, I just grabbed my pack and went outside to wait for my friend. No waiting for my luggage at the baggage claim, no lifting or wheeling thirty pounds of luggage around the airport.
At my friend’s house, I left the cameras in the pack, and swapped the clothes for snacks. Within a short time of arriving, I was on the ground exploring.

The rewards:
I’ve never traveled so light and it was fun. I enjoyed refreshing mountain streams nestled in the forests, scenic views from the tops of mountains, long waterfalls, and peaceful hikes through the forest.

Returning home was bittersweet, but now I know that I DON’T HAVE to take it all with me. Life is full of analogies and I couldn’t help but wonder if I could pack a little lighter in life. Hmmmm….that’s a whole different story.

If you get the opportunity to ditch the luggage and just grab your back pack and head out, you should try it. The freedom is addicting.

Owahee Boardwalk Video

Often when you venture off the beaten path you find some amazing places. Here’s a video of a long boardwalk I found that traverses a couple of ecosystems.
Enjoy the ride and keep exploring!

Owahee Trail

Several people had mentioned I could make this trip, but few people had actually done it. That always makes me a bit suspicious and curious at the same time. Just because you could, doesn’t mean you should….

The trip I’m talking about is Owahee trail which connects Apoxee Park to Grassy Waters Preserve located just west of the Northlake Blvd and Beeline Highway intersection.

Unlike Apoxee, the trail is accessed by exiting the Grassy Waters entrance and heading east on the sidewalk. Just before the Beeline intersection, there is a dirt road on the right. The main gate is locked, but just to the right is an unlocked pedestrian gate.

The trail is a packed dirt road with occasional tree roots, so walkers, hikers, and cyclists with hybrid or mountain bikes, can easily make the trip. Many sections of the trail are shaded by trees which makes it nice on these warm afternoons. Water on the west side provides scenic views and periodically there are benches.

I was surprised what I found near the midway point of the trail. Several canals converge and then flow into the trees and wetlands. It would be the perfect place to launch a kayak or canoe and there is even a launching area. The only problem is the portage to this launch area would be very long.

A short distance from here, was a very long boardwalk that went deep into the preserve. (It’s not the boardwalk in Apoxee) It started out over grassy wetlands, continued through a small forest area, and then exited into an open expanse of crystal clear water. The boardwalk dead ends, but the walk is worth it and a great place for stunning photos.

With all the water, there was plenty of wildlife making an appearance. Wood storks glided over, soft-shell turtles sunned on the bank, herons and Roseate Spoonbills waded through the water. Roseate spoonbills have rose colored torsos and wings, which makes them easy to spot in flight.

spoonbillsmall

I’m unsure of the exact mileage, but the return trip from the Apoxee parking lot to Grassy Waters parking lot took an hour which included a few photo stops.

There are plenty of other side trails that are on the list for the next visit. Regardless of where you start, Owahee is a scenic, easy trail that allows everyone to experience the diversity of nature.

Here’s a link to the trail map: http://www.wpb.org/grassywaters/trail_information.php