Kayaking to Munyon Island

“It’s pretty windy out there. We’ve had some strandings so take your cell phone and here’s the park phone number”.  As I pulled away from the entrance to McArthur Beach State park, I figured “it can’t be that bad”. I’m just going to Munyon Island, not the ocean.

As I’m bringing my kayak to the launching site, 3 guys come back looking thoroughly beat. “It’s rough out there”. Hmmm…..this could be quite an adventure after all. 

With the strong wind behind me, I easily headed toward Munyon Island.  I kept thinking that heading back into those winds was going to be a problem.   Meanwhile, pelicans, osprey and anhingas could be seen enjoying a beautiful day on the water.

As I approached the island from the East, there is a small beach which is perfect for stopping and wading in the water. Today the tide was high so it was about ankle deep but still a nice place to take a break.

Continuing around to the North side of the island, there is an entrance to the interior waterways which are very tranquil. There are several dead ends so at the first fork, go left and that will take you to an open area. Stay straight, ignore the far right fork and a little ways down, you’ll see a pedestrian bridge over the water.  As I pulled up, 3 teens were doing backflips off the bridge into the water. That looked like fun, but I wanted to go explore the boardwalk.

At the west side of this bridge is a small landing area to disembark and take a stroll. If sand in your shorts during lunch isn’t your thing, just follow the boardwalk to the right. There is a large picnic area with tables and shade.  Beyond the picnic area is a boat dock and access to a small beach for relaxing or making sandcastles.

Continuing my water exploration, I was surprised to see an eagle circle overhead.  Of course my camera was in the dry bag. Eagles are easy to spot because they have white heads, black bodies and white tails. Vultures are mostly all black, Ospreys are brown and white, and pelicans are pretty obvious.  Also when the eagle flies, its typically the only bird in the sky as the other raptors respectfully give it a wide berth.

The trip home was definitely an adventure. As I left the quiet waters inside the island, I could see the waves breaking against the beach in front of me. The only way out of the island was to head straight into the waves and wind. The waves broke across the bow in non-stop succession and I paddled hard to move forward. At one point I swore I was just paddling in place. I remembered the park ranger’s warning about strandings. Now I understand!

I kept paddling hard and finally got away from shore, but that was just the beginning. I had to get around the tip of the island which meant going parallel with the waves which is not good for staying upright. I managed to hold enough of an angle to move forward and yet keep from being tossed back into the beach. Once I rounded the corner, the wind and waves were at my back. Whew!! It’s much nicer this way.  After that long paddle into the wind, I was very glad to return to the launching area. Needless to say, I was pretty well spent for the rest of the day.

If you’re looking for a peaceful paddle with the option of stretching your legs and having a picnic, head out to Munyon Island.  Pick a day when the wind is calmer though.  I accessed the water via McArthur Beach state park which is $4 to enter. You can bring your own kayak or rent one of theirs.

For more information: http://www.pbcgov.com/erm/lakes/estuarine/munyon/

A day in Jonathan Dickinson State Park

Sometimes you want to be able to do a little bit of everything and that’s what you find at Jonathan Dickinson State Park.  It’s one of those local places that are often forgotten about because it’s so close. Too often we’re looking to go far when sometimes your own backyard is good for some fun.

In my experiences there, I’ve camped, hiked, biked, kayaked, and even volunteered. Volunteering at a park is a great way to get involved and learn activities you wouldn’t otherwise be able to do.

Ok, so now you want to go, here’s my take on how to spend the day.

First off, go all the way to the back of the park and head out on a kayak. Early morning, the river is peaceful and you can see Osprey nests in the trees and the occasional alligator in the river. At the docks the river is wide, but kayak back a bit and you get into the narrow winding section. You’ll find dark black water that reflects the canopy of large trees and foliage. Turtles and alligators are regular seen back here.

Once back on dry land, grab your bike and head out for a ride. If you have a mountain bike, you can bomb down the many trails that Club Scrub maintains. Sugar sand, hills, planks, and other obstacles make for challenging trails. If that’s not your thing, you can still have a very nice bike ride.

The main road is suitable for cycling and you can explore the entire park on bike. One of my favorites is the old road that runs parallel to the railroad tracks. It’s not technical, but you’re off the beaten path and occasionally will see a hawk or turtle around. It has offshoots to connect to other areas of the park as well.

Now you’re probably hungry so head over to one of the many picnic areas and enjoy lunch near the river. The store also sells food and there’s nothing like an ice cold popsicle on a hot summer day.  While you’re in the store check out the times for the Trapper Nelson boat tour. It’s a motorized boat tour that will take you the historic Trapper Nelson homestead. You’ll learn a wealth of history of the park and its early caretakers. No paddling required, just relax and enjoy the ride. There is an extra fee for the boat tour so inquire before reserving.

After you’ve enjoyed lunch, visit the Kimbell education center and learn more about the park’s history, the variety of plant and wildlife, as well as the many programs offered. Kids welcome!  If you’re there in the summer, you’ll enjoy the air conditioning for sure.

For the rest of the day, it’s time to stretch your legs on the different hiking trails around. The Kitching Creek trail is a nice walk along the river. It connects with other trails so you can walk a nice loop by the river and return to the parking area. There are other trails near the Kimbell center and near the park entrance as well.

The finale of the day will be the walk up the observation tower to watch the sunset. The observation tower is a large platform with a 360 degree view. You can see the ocean Atlantic Ocean to the East and the expanse of the park to the West.

Well that was a full day; kayaking, cycling, boat tour, hiking, and sunset from the observation tower. With two large camping areas and cottages, you can spend the weekend and spread these amenities over a couple of days.

Next time you’re in the Jupiter, Florida area, be sure to spend a day at Jonathan Dickinson State park.

More info here:  http://www.floridastateparks.org/jonathandickinson/

Norton Art After Dark

That’s a guitar? I tilted my head and eventually saw it. Art is always subject to interpretation and this evening was no exception as I explored the Norton’s Art After Dark series. With the time change upon us I thought it timely to explore indoor excursions.

As a photographer, I find it interesting to see other people’s perspectives and in an art museum, you see quite a variety.  Like the long black acrylic plank leaning against the wall which was part of the West Coast Minimalism movement. Art After Dark

Or the 8 foot by 8 foot gunmetal grey square, with squiggly lines at the bottom and protruding dots at the top. I guessed something at night and was close. The artist’s depiction is of the beach, ocean and a starry night.

As I continue, I enjoy the mental challenge and enjoy how different artists break the normal rules; like the clay sculpture with finger impressions to convey the artist’s role in the creation.

History is always interesting and art has plenty.  For example, I didn’t know that Picasso and Braque developed the Cubism style in 1900. They challenged the Renaissance concept that a painting should present a subject from a single point of view. They looked at their subjects as if they were seen from multiple perspectives and then composed accordingly. See, now those pictures make sense.

Art After DarkI also found it interesting the effect of world events on art.  Paintings during the World Wars often were dark to convey the sadness and emotion of the times. Some were optimistic, but you didn’t know the interpretation till you read the accompanying story.  A picture is worth a thousand words but the artist’s story behind it is priceless.

In addition to browsing the three different floors of the gallery, there was a short tour on surrealism, an artist’s talk, and a jazz band on the lower level.

Art After Dark is every Thursday night with a different theme. Doors are open from 5-9pm and the cost is $12. County residents have free admission to the museum at the following times though:

Palm Beach County residents receive FREE admission on the first Saturday of every month. *
West Palm Beach residents receive FREE admission every Saturday. *

* Must present valid photo ID

http://www.norton.org/